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As the year continues, so does Donley’s 75th year anniversary celebration.   


Last week Mac Donley visited the Raleigh office to discuss the history of Donley’s with the DCG team.  After the presentation, the DCG team presented Mac with a commemorative plaque celebrating the 75th Anniversary.  Ron Marion led the DCG effort in creating this wonderful gift.

It was just 75 years ago that   Don and Phil Donley established Ernest F. Donley Sons, Inc. as concrete formwork contractors by purchasing the construction department of Donley Brothers Company.  In 2009, Donley’s acquired Blair Concrete in Raleigh, North Carolina, extending its geographic range of concrete services. Four years later Donley’s opens a second Southeast Regional office in South Carolina.
Perhaps the best tool to come along in industrial construction (at least as far as safety is concerned) is the Field Level Risk Assessment or Job Hazard Analysis. Whatever you call it, this is a tool that makes everyone stop and think about the different risks associated with the task. The same principle of these risk assessments can be done in our shops. Simply take a four-second “reset”. Take four seconds before starting some new familiar task. 

This four second reset was first instituted on CN Rail. This was part of a strategy to reduce the number of very serious incidents they were having including many amputation injuries. What they found was that their employee knew the rule or procedure to do the job without getting injured but were simply not focused. Even well rested employees were getting caught up in the routine of the day and found themselves daydreaming or thinking about other things. 

This act of refocusing has been shown to reduce the probability of an injury incident by more than 90% versus not taking the four seconds. How hard is that? You may have done the task you are about to perform thousands of times before. In your mind, you know that you could do it with your eyes closed. It is usually not the task itself but some small thing you did not anticipate that causes the incident. You did not notice the debris in front of the tool you were going to pick up. You did not notice somebody placed something on the part you were about to pick up. You did not realize how heavy a piece is that you were asked to help carry. It is easy to imagine the different activities we do every day and how this applies. For example, getting in a forklift and having a quick look around. We change our thinking from where we are going to focusing on the area, road conditions, other vehicles and so on. This is the “reset” we are talking about. 

Believe it or not, four seconds is all it takes. Get in this habit of taking four seconds and it significantly reduces the chance of injury. We highly recommend this four second “reset” as an excellent way to refocus on the job at hand, and we believe that this is one very effective method to prevent injury on and off the job. 


 
Next week, Donley's will embark on a 21 week educational and training campaign, promoting not only OSHA Standards related to Fall Protection but also best practices as they relate to our industry. Our goal is to raise awareness of preventing fall protection hazards by engaging our team members through targeted, task specific, hands-on training. Through this, we hope to bring Fall Protection to the forefront, understanding that even today it continues to be the leading cause of construction site fatalities, as well as being among the top 10 most frequently cited OSHA Standards. The Fall Prevention Campaign will be in effect from May 2nd - September 30th, 2016. The first week (May 2nd - 6th), the Campaign will coincide with OSHA's National Safety Stand-Down To Prevent Falls in Construction.



February 14, was not only Valentine’s Day, it also marked our 75th anniversary.  

Happy Anniversary to everyone at Donley’s and to all of our clients and team partners!  Thank you for being such important part of our history and future.  

Ernest F.  Donley’s  Sons was founded on February 14, 1941.  The Founders started the business in February, 1941 by purchasing the Construction Department of Donley Brothers . Donley's started as a formwork contractor and jobbers of contractor 's hand tool s. At the time, there was a small lathing for plaster business, mainly residential and light commercial. The formwork business was mainly pans and open centering, plus beams and columns. For pan or one-way, joist jobs, Donley's was very competitive and was the only local source for metal pan forms. World War II started just after Donley's was incorporated and very quickly the emphasis changed from construction to industrial mill supplies, including saw sales and sharpening. The basic tool lines being distributed to contractors also had industrial application. The saw sharpening and hand tool business expanded and various lines were added that broaden the scope to include automotive tool jobber lines. 

Today marks the beginning of our anniversary celebrations.  You will notice that our new anniversary logo has been integrated into our website, email signature and letterhead.  We will also creating job site banners that will be put in place in March.  There will be many different ways that we celebrate this year, so stay tuned.

“Haste Makes Waste” is a popular saying when it comes to rushing to complete a task or job.  Another saying more closely associated with safety on the job is, “Hurrying Up Can Hurt.”  Sometimes being in a hurry can cause accidents, such as using the wrong ladder for a job just because it was closer than the ladder that was the correct height or not wearing safety glasses because the job will only take a second.  

However, it should be pointed out that while hurrying unnecessarily is frowned upon, faster ways of doing things may be beneficial at times.  If there is a better way of doing a certain job, bring it to the attention of a supervisor.  But do not proceed to use the new method or make any changes without first getting approval.

One of the safest means of speeding up operations is through experience.  The more familiar jobs become, the more efficiency and speed increase.  Be careful not to reach the point where increased speed through experience becomes negligible and the danger of not remaining alert on the job grows.

Taking a shortcut or rushing to save time can lead to unnecessary accidents, and in the end, may not save that much time or be worth the risk.  

Setting a good example is not a put-on.  It’s simply working safety into your daily routine at home and on the job.  In fact, new employees benefit by seeing operations conducted the safe way. Through observation and via interaction with fellow workers, working safe becomes learned behavior and will eventually become routine.  

Actions will always speak louder than words.  When we let our safety glasses resting on our foreheads rather than in place over our eyes, or when we kick an empty water bottle under a bench rather than pick it up, we’re sending the message that safety doesn't really matter.      

There’s another angle to setting good examples.  Too often people dress to impress others rather than with a focus on safety.  Always dress for the job as it will give way to the more important and more beneficial images of safety.  Wearing rings, bracelets, and other ornaments is dangerous on a joist as it could get caught by the moving parts of machinery.  Long sleeves, floppy pant legs, and long hair can be hazardous on some jobs as well.  
 
Accidents are a reality so make personal safety a priority and set an example for others to follow. 

Prolonged exposure to freezing temperatures can result in health problems.  With the recent drop in temperatures, we need to be especially mindful of the weather, its effects on the body, proper prevention techniques, and treatment of cold related disorders.

Personal Protective Clothing
  • Wear at least three layers of clothing
  1. An outer layer to break wind and allow some ventilation
  2. A middle layer of wool or synthetic fabric to absorb sweat and retain insulation in a damp environment
  3. An inner layer of cotton or synthetic weaves to allow ventilation
  • Pay special attention to protecting feet, hands, face and head.  Up to 40% of body heat can be lost when the head is exposed. 
  • Keep a change of clothing available in case work garments become wet.

Engineering Controls
  • There are a variety of practices to help reduce the risk of cold related injuries.  
  • Use an on-site source of heat
  • Shield work areas from drafty or windy conditions
  • Provide a heated shelter for employees
  • Use thermal insulating material on equipment handles when the temperature drops below freezing

Safe Work Practices
  • Changes in work are sometimes necessary to combat the effects of exceedingly cold weather.
  • Allow a period of adjustment to the cold before embarking on a full work schedule
  • Always permit employees to set their ow pace and take extra breaks when needed
  • Reduce the number of activities performed outdoors
  • Ensure that employees remain hydrated
  • Establish a buddy system for working outdoors
  • Educate employees to the symptoms of cold related stresses such as heavy shivering, uncomfortable coldness, severe fatigue, drowsiness, or euphoria  

It’s that time of year again when driving can be treacherous.  Black ice is the deadliest danger when driving during the winter and is formed when snow melts and then refreezes.  Since it is almost invisible, many people drive at normal speeds resulting in serious accidents.  Pavement that looks dry but appears darker in color and dull-looking should alert to the presence of black ice.  


Many accidents could be avoided by following these tips for driving safely during snowy and icy conditions.
  • Drive at slower speeds, anticipate stops at traffic lights and intersections, and apply breaks sooner than normal helps ensure accident-free stops.  
  • Leave extra space between vehicles allowing room to maneuver in case something goes wrong.  
  • REMEMBER TO KEEP WINDOWS CLEAR.  
  • Always try, if possible, to drive and go out after the snow plows and sanding trucks have had a chance to clear the roads. 
  • Allow extra time to reach your destination during the winter or when the weather is bad.
  • If your car is stuck, DO NOT spin your wheels.  This will only dig the car in deeper.  
    • Turn your wheels from side to side a few times to push snow out of the way.  
    • Use a light touch of gas, to ease your car out.  
    • Use a shovel to clear snow away from the wheels and the underside of the car wheels, to help get traction.   
Remember to always be safe when driving, no matter what season, and in the winter take extra precautions when driving.