News & Events

Month List

Donley’s was pleased to recently accept the 2016 Ohio AGC Construction Safety Excellence Award, Building Division Over 1 Million Hours.  This is the industry’s elite safety excellence award.

The award recognizes those construction companies that excel at safety and health performance, examining each candidate’s commitment to safety and occupational health management and risk control. The selection process is comprehensive, closely examining each candidate’s commitment to safety and occupational health management and risk control. It includes: the review of a company’s commitment to management, active employee participation, safety training, work site hazard identification and control, and safety program innovation.
It’s that time of year again when driving can be treacherous.  Black ice is the deadliest danger when driving during the winter and is formed when snow melts and then refreezes.  Since it is almost invisible, many people drive at normal speeds resulting in serious accidents.  Pavement that looks dry but appears darker in color and dull-looking should alert to the presence of black ice.  


Many accidents could be avoided by following these tips for driving safely during snowy and icy conditions.
  • Drive at slower speeds, anticipate stops at traffic lights and intersections, and apply breaks sooner than normal helps ensure accident-free stops.  
  • Leave extra space between vehicles allowing room to maneuver in case something goes wrong.  
  • REMEMBER TO KEEP WINDOWS CLEAR.  
  • Always try, if possible, to drive and go out after the snow plows and sanding trucks have had a chance to clear the roads. 
  • Allow extra time to reach your destination during the winter or when the weather is bad.
  • If your car is stuck, DO NOT spin your wheels.  This will only dig the car in deeper.  
    • Turn your wheels from side to side a few times to push snow out of the way.  
    • Use a light touch of gas, to ease your car out.  
    • Use a shovel to clear snow away from the wheels and the underside of the car wheels, to help get traction.   
Remember to always be safe when driving, no matter what season, and in the winter take extra precautions when driving.

During the Holiday Season, you’d probably be disappointed if the only gift you received was a box full of safety tips. Come on, admit it. What you really wanted were those miracle golf clubs that can drive a ball a mile down the fairway or a bass boat.

But let’s think for a moment. A box full of safety tips could mean a lot: 
  1. You don’t lose your vision when that steel shard hits because you’re wearing safety glasses.
  2. You have just a slight headache when that 2x4 from the third floor glances off your hard hat.
  3. When you drop a jackhammer, those steel-toed boots protect your feet.
  4. When you operate a hoe-ram all week (BAM! BAM! BAM! BAM!), those ear plugs maintain your hearing.
  5. When you stand behind the excavator and the operator suddenly puts it in reverse, you heed the back-up alarm and step out of harm’s way.
  6. When you excavate a 10-ft. trench over a major gas line, the one-call center marks the line’s precise location, allowing you to work safely.

All year long you've heard messages that remind you to "work safely…don't take short‐cuts… prevent accidents…." To do this, of course, you have to keep your mind on your work. But this time of the year, your mind may be everywhere else but on your work. You may be thinking….
How will I pay for Christmas??? It costs a fortune!
Traffic is so bad I'm a wreck every time I get where I'm going.
My relatives and their kids are going to be here for a whole week!
If I hear Alvin & The Chipmunks one more time, I'll smash the radio!

So, from the Donley's family to yours... Happy Holidays! 

And remember, one of the best gifts you can give your loved ones, is YOU returning home safe!

Quick Quiz - Where is the nearest fire extinguisher right now? Where is the closest portable fire extinguisher to your work area?

It is very important that we are aware of the locations of portable fire extinguishers because if a fire were to occur, in the panic of the moment seconds count.

More importantly, when is the last time you actually looked at the portable fire extinguisher in your work area?

  • Is it charged fully?
  • Is it damaged?
  • Is it the proper type for the hazards in your area?
  • Is it hung properly?
  • Is it blocked?
  • Has it been hydrostatically tested in the past 5-12 years?

In the construction industry, fatalities have been known to occur because corrosion build-up on the bottom of the fire extinguisher was serious enough that the extinguisher case ruptured when it was activated. The parts struck the employee in the chest.

 A similar incident occurred in 1988. This fire extinguisher had a rubber boot or cap to protect the bottom of the cylinder case. Moisture had seeped in between the rubber and outside cylinder wall and caused the cylinder to corrode inside the boot.


     


Over time, this corrosion weakened the cylinder and it ruptured when the internal CO2 cylinder was activated. Other extinguishers of this type have been found to have the same type of corrosion underneath the rubber boot.

These stories remind us of the importance of In-depth inspections and routine testing of these devices. Especially if your fire extinguishers have rubber or plastic boots or caps and are located in potentially corrosive environments such as:

  •  outside, unprotected from the weather
  •  wet or damp environment, or
  •  near marine facilities or other waterfront buildings, especially those located near salt water

Many contractors have a third-party service inspect fire extinguishers monthly or on another periodic schedule. However, we also recommend taking personal responsibility because safety is everyone's responsibility. Have you looked at the extinguisher in your work area? Are you sure it has been looked at recently? Are you sure it wasn't missed during the last formal inspection? 

We urge you to take a moment today and take a look at any extinguisher in your area. Let your superintendent or supervisor know if you see signs that it is damaged or uncharged so it can be taken out of service and a replacement installed... it may just save a life.

There are a couple of frequently used sayings concerning this type of behavior, such as, “Haste Makes Waste” and “The Hurrier I Go, the Behinder I Get.” Another one which is more closely associated with safety on the job is, “Hurrying-Up Can Hurt.”


These types of accidents are easy to identify, but there are others resulting from being in a hurry that we should consider for a moment. For instance:

  • Using the wrong ladder for the job just because it is closer than the one that is the right height.
  • Not wearing safety glasses because the job will only take a second.
  • Not taking time to properly lock-out and tag machinery you want to make repairs on.
  • Carrying a heavy object without first planning a safe route.
  • Leaving water or oil on the floor for someone else to wipe up—probably with the seat of their pants.
Sometime, think back to an incident when you nearly got hurt. When you review the circumstances of the near-miss, there is a good chance that hurrying was part of your difficulty. If you took a shortcut, you probably realize, as most of us do sooner or later, the shortcut really didn’t save any time and was not worth the risk involved.

However, it should be pointed out that while hurrying unnecessarily is frowned upon, faster ways of doing things may be beneficial at times. If you think that there is a better way of doing a certain job, by all means bring it to the attention of your Supervisor. But do not proceed to use the new method or make any changes without first getting them approved.

One of the safest means of speeding up operations is through experience. As we become more familiar with our jobs, our efficiency and speed increase. But this is taken into consideration in planning jobs and how they should be handled; and then, of course, we all reach a point where increased speed through experience becomes negligible, and the danger of not remaining alert on the job grows.

Obviously, accidents cost money. So if you think that meeting the cost of living is rough now, just imagine what it would be like if you had to face expenses without a full paycheck because of a work injury. So, both physically and financially, hurrying can hurt.
Setting a good example is not a put-on. It's simply working safety into your daily routine at home and on the job. When we all work safely, everyone's job is safe and their future more secure.


New employees certainly benefit by seeing operations conducted the safe way. As you all know from experience, people new on the job take a while to adjust and to discover who they are in the overall set-up of the plant. New employees who have never held a job before or were employed by a firm that had a weak safety program probably will need considerable safety instruction. We will attempt to give it to them, but naturally, they also observe and seek advice and information from fellow workers. These early impressions of you and of safety operations will be at least partially formed through these contacts and observations.

On the other hand, newcomers formerly employed by a firm that emphasized safety will probably think more of you personally if you measure up to the caliber of people they are accustomed to working with.

"Don't do as I do; do as I say" is a pretty tired expression, and it got tired because we all have repeated it many times not just verbally but through our actions; and actions speak louder than words. When we leave our safety glasses resting on our foreheads rather than in place over our eyes, or when we kick an empty milk carton under a bench rather than pick it up, we're selling safety but it's a useless soft sell. Our actions are saying, "I believe in wearing eye protection but not in protecting my eyes; and I know trash can cause a tripping accident, but it isn't important enough to make me pick it up." 

There's another angle to setting good examples. Too often people dress to impress others with their good taste rather than their knowledge of safety. Wearing rings, bracelets, and other ornaments is dangerous around machinery and in many other jobs where it's possible for jewelry to be caught by moving parts of machinery, thus cause injury to the wearer. Long sleeves, floppy pant legs, and long hair can be hazardous on some jobs, too.

So we should always dress for the job. Our image as a fashion expert may suffer, but it will give way to the more important and more beneficial image of safety.

Maybe some of us feel we are already setting good examples for safety, but maybe this self-image isn't too accurate. Think just for a moment isn’t it strange that we always think about having the nice things happen to us and when we think about an accident, it's usually happening to someone else?

Accidents are a reality. Make your personal safety just as real and you'll have a good chance of not becoming the other person to whom accidents are always happening.

We also might remember that our children someday will be entering the work force. And they, like the newcomer on the job, can benefit by our actions that exemplify safety consciousness.

Most of us try to demonstrate to our kids how to cross streets or how to light matches when they're of age. If, through the years, your kids learn from you how to use a ladder correctly, or that it's good practice to keep tools in their proper places or that there's a right way to lift things, you've given them an additional opportunity for the better life the future promises.