Unguarded Protruding Steel Rebar Tool Box Talks

Am I in Danger?

  • Unguarded protruding steel
    reinforcing bars are hazardous. Even if you just stumble onto an unguarded
    rebar you can impale yourself, resulting in serious internal injuries or death.

SAFETY REMINDER – ALL EMPLOYEES MUST BE PROTECTED FROM THE HAZARDS OF IMPALEMENT OR CURS AND SCRAPES FROM REBAR

Opioid Use Tool Box Talks

WHAT TO DO IF YOU ARE PRESCRIBED AN OPIOID


If your health care provider believes a prescription opioid such as hydrocodone, oxycodone or codeine is the most effective way to manage your pain, it is important to understand that these medication are highly addictive. In 2015, overdose deaths from prescription opioids killed more than 20,000 people in the U.S. alone.


As you should with any new medication, if your health care provider wants to prescribe an opioid, it is important to ask questions before you get it filled.

 

Questions You Should Ask:

  1. Why do I need this medication? Ask if there are non-opioid options you could take instead.

  2. What if I have a history of addiction? Make sure your health care provider knows you have had issues with drugs or alcohol and if you have a history of smoking. This could change your treatment plan.

  3. How long should I take this medication? Ask for the lowest effective dose in the smallest quantity so you don’t have leftover medication.

  4. How can I reduce the risk of side effects? Take your medication as prescribed and make sure you are aware of potential side effects such as excessive sleepiness or craving more of the medication. Alert your health care provider immediately if you experience them.

  5. What if I am taking other medications? You can reduce your risk for dangerous interactions by making sure your health care provider is aware of all the prescription and over-the-counter medications and supplements you take.

Write your questions down ahead of time and write down necessary information during your visit. If you think of something else after your appointment is over, don’t be afraid to call back. Most medical offices have staff on hand who can help if your health care provider is not available and you need answers right away. Your pharmacist can also be a valuable resource.


Don’t assume your health care provider will automatically tell you everything you should know about an opioid medication on any other treatment. Not asking questions can have serious consequences on your health and your life.


Use of Opioid Medication

  1. Where should I keep my opioid medication? If you have children at home, including teenagers, store it where it cannot be seen or reached.

  2. What if I have unused opioid medication? Don’t keep it. Leftover opioids can be found and used by others. Ask your pharmacist how best to dispose of leftover medication – the answer may depend on the specific medication. Further information on safe drug disposal is available from the Food and Drug Administration at www.fda.gov/Drugs/ResourcesForYou/Consumers

  3. Should I have naloxone in my house? Naloxone can reverse the effects of an opioid overdose. Naloxone is available over-the-counter in many state and in all over Canada. Your health care provider can also prescribe naloxone if you want it in your home and live in a place where a prescription is required.


Information taken from material originally written by Janet Lubman Rathner of the Laborers’ Health & Safety Fund of North America.

Hazard Communication Part 2 – Tool Box Talks

WHAT IS ON A METERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET (MSDS)

  • An MSDS is broken into several sections


General Company Information Section

  • Manufacturer’s Name

  • Emergency Telephone Number

  • Address (Number, Street, City, State, and Zip Code)

  • Date Prepared

Hazard Ingredients Section

  • Chemical and Common Name(s)

  • OSHA PEL – Regulation

  • ACGIH – TLV – Recommendation

Physical Characteristics Section

  • Specific Gravity (H20=1)

  • > 1 Sinks in water

  • < 1 Floats on water

  • Vapor Density (AIR=1)

    • > 1 Sinks in Air

    • < 1 Floats on Air

  • Evaporation Rate (Butyl Acetate = 1)

    • > 1 Fast Evaporation

    • < 1 Slow Evaporation

  • Appearance and Odor

  • Safe Handling and Use Section

    • Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled

    • Disposal Method

    • Precautions to be Taken in Handling and Storing 

    Fire and Explosion Hazard Section

    • Flash Point

    • Below 100 Degrees

    • At or Above 100 Degrees

  • Flammable Limits LEL or UEL

  • Extinguishing Media

  • Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards

  • Reactivity Data Section

    • Stability

    • Incompatibility

    Health Hazard Data Section

    • Route(s) of Entry:

    • Inhalation/Skin/Ingestion

  • Health Hazards

    • Acute (Short Term)

    • Chronic (Long Term)

  • Carcinogenicity

    • National Toxicology Program

    • International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC)

  • Signs and Symptoms of Exposure

  • Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure

  • Emergency and First Aid Procedures

  • Methods to Protect Employees

  • SAFETY REMINDER – YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO KNOW, SO IF YOU DON’T KNOW, ASK

    Hazard Com 2.jpg (453.2KB)

    Hazard Communication Part 1 – Tool Box Talks

    The Hazard
    Communication Standard States:

    • Every company which produces and
      uses hazardous materials must provide their employees with information and
      training on the proper handling and use of these materials.

    • You, as an employee, have a Right
      to Know about the hazardous materials used in your work area and the potential
      effects of these materials upon your health and safety.

     

    Key Elements of the
    Osha Hazard Communication Standard

    • Materials Inventory – A list of the hazardous
      materials present in your work area.

    • Material Safety Data Sheets – A detailed description of each
      hazardous material listed in the Materials Inventory.

    • Labeling – Containers of hazardous
      materials must have labels which identify the material and warn of its
      potential hazard to employees.

    • Training – All employees must be trained
      to identify and work safely with hazardous materials.

    • Written Program – A written program must be
      developed which ties all of the above together.

     
    Controlling Physical and Health Hazards

    • Product
      Substitution

      • Because many chemicals do similar jobs, it
        is important to select chemicals that do a good job, while being less toxic.

    • Engineering
      Controls

      • Well-designed work areas minimize exposure
        to materials which are hazardous. Examples of engineering controls would
        include exhaust systems and wetting systems to control dust.

    • Safe Work
      Practices

      • Safe work practices will insure that
        chemicals are used correctly and safely.

    • Personal
      Protective Equipment

      • Masks, eye protection, gloves, aprons, and
        other protective equipment and clothing are designed to protect you while you
        work. USE THEM!

    • Training
      and Communication

      • Knowing how to work safely with chemicals
        that pose a hazard is an important activity. You have a right to know, but you
        also have a responsibility to use the knowledge and skills to work safely.

    • Environmental
      Monitoring

      • Industrial hygiene personnel regularly
        sample the air and collect other samples to insure that hazardous chemicals do
        not exceed established acceptable exposure limits.

    • Personal
      Monitoring

      • Monitor yourself and others. Be on the
        lookout for any physical symptoms which would indicate that you or your
        coworkers have been overexposed to any hazardous chemical. Symptoms, such as
        skin rashes, dizziness, eye or throat irritations or strong odors, should be
        reported to your supervisor.

     SAFETY REMINDER – YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO KNOW, SO IF YOU DON’T KNOW, ASK

    Aerial Lift Safety Tool Box Talks

    About 26 construction workers die each year from using aerial
    lifts. More than half of the deaths involve boom-supported lifts, such as
    bucket trucks and cherry pickers; most of the other deaths involve scissor
    lifts. Electrocutions, falls, and tip-overs cause most of the deaths. Other
    causes include being caught between the lift bucket or guardrail and object
    (such as steel beams or joists) and being struck by falling objects. (A worker
    can also be catapulted out of a bucket, if the boom or bucket is struck by something.)
    Most of the workers killed are electrical workers, laborers, painters,
    ironworkers, or carpenters.

     


    On Oct. 12 in downtown Philadelphia, a 41-year-old employee was
    using the 125-ft-tall AWP to inspect the façade of the city’s First
    Presbyterian Church. Investigators believe the employee, who was running the
    unit on an urban sidewalk, drove over a vault lid with the boom extended. The
    lid collapsed under the weight of the 20-ton machine, throwing the machine off
    balance and causing it to tip over. “He was very experienced,” says the owner
    of Masonry Preservation Group Inc. The lid that collapsed is a common sidewalk covering
    made of “a composite fiberglass” material, says Al D’Imperio, Philadelphia-area
    director of the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration. “We are
    looking at all aspects of the site,” he adds. City officials say the vault
    cover, about 1 ft. wide, 2 ft. long and owned by cable company Comcast, was up
    to code.


     Image and video hosting by TinyPic    Image and video hosting by TinyPic


    Before Operating an Aerial Lift

    • YOU MUST BE AN AUTHORIZED OPERATOR!

    • Check operating and emergency controls, safety
      devices (such as, outriggers and guardrails), personal fall protection

    • gear, wheels and tires, and other items
      specified by the manufacturer.

    • Look for possible leaks (air, hydraulic fluid,
      and fuel-system) and loose or missing parts.

    • Check the area the lift will travel and be
      used.

    • Look for a level surface that won’t shift.

    • Check the slope of the ground or floor; do not
      work on steep slopes that exceed slope limits listed by the manufacturer.

    • Look for hazards, such as, holes, drop-offs,
      bumps, and debris, and overhead power lines and other obstructions.

    • Set outriggers, brakes, and wheel chocks – even
      if you’re working on a level slope.

    • Check the wind speed. Are
      you above the manufacturer’s maximum wind speed


    SAFETY REMINDER

    UNDERSTAND THE LIMITS AND ABILITIES OF THE LIFT AND ALWAYS INSPECT THE LIFT AND THE SURFACE BEING USED.