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Month List

Show your team the importance of safety meetings by following the suggested agenda below:

DOCUMENT ON TOP AND/OR BOTTOM OF SIGN-IN SHEET:
  • Project name
  • Project number
  • Date
  • Project Superintendent conducting meeting
Distribute a sign-in sheet and require attendees sign in for attendance records. 

DISCUSSION POINTS:
  • Scheduled Tool Box Talk
  • Any safety items identified from superintendent twice a week safety audits
  • Any safety items identified during and Project Safety Review’s (PSR’s) conducted since last meeting
CONSIDER A WEEKLY SAFETY RAFFLE
  • Project qualifies if there have been no OSHA recordable accidents, near miss incidents, or serious safety issues documented on the PSR since last safety meeting
  • Winner of raffle to receive $25.00 or other items that may be donated by suppliers and/or contractors
  • Ensure winner signs receipt book
COMPLETE PROJECT SAFETY MEETING
  • Collect Sign-in Sheets and store on-site as appropriate
  • Scan and email one copy of the Tool Box Talk, along with the agenda, and all sign-in sheets to designated person (i.e., Safety Administrative Assistant with the subject line referencing: project name, Tool Box Talk Topic, and date performed.
When it comes to Personal Protective Equipment, one type does NOT fit all tasks.

EYE AND FACE PROTECTION: ANSI Z87.1 REQUIREMENT
  • Eye protection must be worn at all times while on the project site.
  • Face shield must be worn any time there are flying particles that could strike the face
  • Eye protection must be worn under the face-shields.
  • Employees involved in welding or cutting operations MUST wear eye protection and at least the proper
  • shade number as indicated in the table below. 

HEAD PROTECTION
  • Head protective equipment (HARD HATS) shall be worn at all times while on the project. 
  • Helmets for protection against impact and penetration of falling and flying objects shall meet the requirements of ANSI Z89.1-1969.

GARMENTS
CLASS 1 GARMENTS (MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL DONLEY’S PROJECTS)
  • Intended for use in activities that permit the wearer's full and undivided attention to approaching traffic. 
  • There should be ample separation of the worker from traffic, which should be traveling no faster than 25 mph. 
  • Vests, shirts, coats shall have the required reflective stripes. 

CLASS 2 GARMENTS
  • Recommended for workers who perform tasks that divert their attention from approaching traffic, or that put them in close proximity to passing vehicles traveling at 25 mph to 50 mph. 

CLASS 3 GARMENTS
  • Recommended for roadway construction personnel and flaggers, utility workers, survey crews and emergency response personnel or anyone working in a close proximity to a passing vehicle traveling at 50 mph or higher.


Safety is more than just following your company’s guidelines or what OSHA says while you work. Safety is actually a combination of a safe attitude, behavior, and control on and off the job. Attitude means your frame of mind and the way in which you approach a given situation. Behavior means what you do about it and how you react to a situation. Control refers to making your surroundings, where and what you do, safe. Safe attitude, behavior, and control add up to a safer more productive you.

Attitude
When it comes to safety, attitude isn’t exactly everything, but it’s darn close. A safe attitude means staying alert and focused on the task at hand, taking safety guidelines and practices seriously, never horsing around on the job, and not letting emotions like anger and frustration get in the way of job performance.

Behavior
How you react to a situation is an important part of being safe. Following established safety guidelines and procedures, refusing to take shortcuts, using personal protective equipment, asking questions when you need more information are all safe behaviors. Safe behavior also means helping friends, coworkers, and family members understand the importance of safe practices at work, home, or play.

Control
Control means taking responsibility for a safe place. You can help keep your surroundings safe from potential hazards by keeping them clean and orderly. Keep machines in good repair, clean up spills and debris (or report them to the appropriate person), and make sure that walkways are free from obstacles. Store chemicals properly (both at home and on the job) and never switch containers. At work, be sure to report faulty equipment ventilation, or any potential hazards to your supervisor.

ABC’S – EASY AS 1-2-3
Attitude, behavior, and control are the three most important (and perhaps the simplest) aspects of personal safety both on and off the job. Take a moment to review your safety ABC’s to see if you’re doing all you can to protect yourself, your coworkers, and your loves ones from careless, needless, injury.